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composed of the united states, sweden, norway, denmark, and canada who would care? what would be the point? the whole point of those bodies is to confront those countries whose behavior is problematic. you have to have the human rights violators in the human rights council, otherwisethere is no point. i think that is with the idea of some standards for performance should come in for who gets to sit on what body at the u.n. host: the united nations came into existence in 1945. the currentecretary general of the u.n. is -- albert on our republican line, go ahead. obama: why haven't the administration pulled the plug on colonialism? he had a shot to do his legacy in foreign policy but he has not spoken out against colonialism? could you explain that to me? guest: there is not much of it left. there are few countries left in the world under colonialism. he has talked to the united nations about the need to fd new ways of cooperation against transnational cooperative the threats. i think his argument at the united nations has been -- has been pretty compelling. his argument at the un, i think,
recovery. what other areas to the canada is think we need to challenge the media consensus in order to run the argument for the margin the biggest political problem is looking into an aisle at the financial system relation. we have to set forward a credible alternative. we need to pay back the deficit. more should come from taxes, because times like this, if you have cuts that we're looking at,, and a difficult argument that this should not give the nhs increases right now. i would give inflationary increases. >> it is right to say that we should challenge the media consensus. i would challenge on this. this leadership election is a race between the two miliband brothers. we want to say to you is that there is -- it will not be the media decides the election, but the labour party. >> the most dangerous media consensus, the national minimum wage, saving on our national health service, improving schools faster than anywhere, the greatest danger for the labour party in the future britain is that we have stagnant wages when we're more confident than we were in 1997 and we have to depend that w
look at some of the other countries and the policies that they have, excuse me. you can look at canada, united kingdom, australia, for example. they set up a scoring point system that reward people for being able to contribute to the host country. now, i have long said that the immigration policy in the united states of america should be designed to enhance the economic, social and cultural well-being of the united states. that should be actually the policy of any sovereign nation in the world, should establish an immigration policy for the purposes of enhancing the economic, social and cultural well-being that have particular sovereign state. in this case, it's the united states of america. we should also understand that one of the essential pillars of american exceptionalism is the rule of law. if we have contempt for the rule of law, if we have some of the highest profile people in america openly speak about hiring illegals to take care of their home and at the same time advocate for the dream act which is amnesty for a specific class of people, we regard -- reward for illegal behav
countries, including great btain, australia, canada, the netherlands, and israel, allow open service by lesbian and gay troops. we have no greater allies than great britain, australia, canada, and israel, and none of these countries, not one, reports morale or recruitment problems. at least nine of these countries have deployedheir forces alongside american troops in operation iraqi freedom, and at least 12 of these nations are allowing open service and are currently fighting alongside u.s. troops in afghanistan. there's a cost involved in our current policy. according to a 2005 g.a.o. report, american taxpayers spend more than $30 milon each year to train replacement for gay troops discharged under the n't ask, d't policy. the total costs reported since the statute was implemented, according to g.a.o., has been nearly $200 million and that doesn't count the administrative and legal costs associatedith investigations and hearings. the militar schooling of gay troops, such as pilot training and linguist training. we are losing highly-skilled troops to this policy. cording to the g.a.o
running for office. it is unheard of in great britain or canada for any party to ever think about changing the law to keep its competition off the bell. and the britain anyone can get on about -- to keep them off the ballot in this country. in canada but it only takes 100 signatures. it does not occur to people in most countries that is legitimate for two parties to get together and keep competition off the ballot. host: for those who tried to keep the parties off the ballots, what is the main reasoning? guest: it depends on whether they are talking honestly or not. if you want an example of an honest comment, i was at a georgia state legislative hearing once and a legislator on the elections committee said, i don't want no damn libertarian running against me. i appreciated that. when the law came before judges, the judges will not say something like that. they constantly tell us we are in danger of overcrowded ballots that will cause the utter confusion. the truth is, we suffer from under-crowded ballots. i have been tracking state legislative candidacies for 20 years. every election year
and e.u. on exchange of information. we work very closely with canada and mexico, our two neighbors. and so there is a huge amount of interaction at the international level but all designed to minimize the risk that a terrorist could either enter the united states or be plotting somewhere else to injure u.s. interests. >> senator mueller. >> senator, we've realized for a number of years, certainly before my time, that our success is in large part dependent on working with our counterparts overseas. we have over 60 legal offices in embassies around the world which we use as liaisons to our counterparts. we have since the 1970's a national academy in which we've brought in state and local law enforcement for a 10-week period for training. we have for many years included our foreign counterparts, whether it be from iraq or pakistan or afghanistan as part of those classes in an effort to educate persons as to what the f.b.i. does but also how the f.b.i. does it and what we do not do. in those relatively small ways but i think important ways we have developed persons that provide the rel
and canada are encountered numerous i e d's or improvised -- helmand and kandahar encounter numerous improvised explosive devices. of the question is are these fatalities from roadside dime -- roadside bombs assigned the u.s. is making inroads in places they previously did not have success. a brigadier who commands ground forces and helmand province says -- taliban fighters suffered submitting casualties when they battle coalition troops. then they peppered the fields and orchards with ied's during the night. when that happens, the taliban tend to fall back, and such minefields are a last-ditch effort to hold off defeat, they say. the enemy would be glad to box off and put an area of mine field all the way around us. we will get back to your calls in a moment. "usa today" has a graphic, improvised explosive devices on the rise. of 2008's august versus 2009 and this year. ied incidents back in august of 2008, 4000 -- 439. last year, 1067. august of this year, more than 1200 attacks in afghanistan. montana. a bill on our democrats line. good morning. caller: good morning. host: curb co
this. he should back the canada. but he has his own supporters, many of them republicans who feel that he have the right to run. >> this is the last vestiges of the republican party, and i kept this because, this is a republican symbol from south africa. my friend from south africa brought me this back. the only vestige i cap. and i did keep one of these, which is the poster we had made up for mccain and palin in 2008. these were made up for $1 apiece. the f-15 hundred of them made and they went in a couple of hours. they were gone. and we actually 14 mccain and pale and here in virginia beach. -- we actually won for mccain and palin here in virginia beach. >> it president obama carried this district, then his policies are and joined in this debate. glenn did not vote for the health care bill, but they want to use that against them. in some way, it is viewed as a referendum on the president's policies. it may say something about obama is chances in virginia in 2012. >> our local content vehicles are traveling the country, visiting communities and congressional districts as we look
states, but not exclusive of other population. we imagined it would look a bit like canada and the united states, france and germany, where people would be able to cross the border. the israelis could be able to shop in palestinian areas, palestinians coming over to the israeli side -- and it has been repeated recently -- palestinians are not opposed to jews living in a palestinian state. we recognize the jewish people have religious and historic ties that will be the palestinian state. there is no objection to the jews living in the palestinian state. are they going to live in there as a palestinian citizen, as israeli citizens, under what framework? this vision of two states with multi-ethnic population is moving back and forth, this has taken a beating since i was in negotiations. over the course of all the violence that has taken recently, specifically in israel, over two exclusive populations. i think there needs to be a conclusion in a two state solution that allows both jews and palestinians to have access to both countries. the more interaction there will be, the more peace will b
made as the canada. 4.5 million small businesses and individuals will be eligible to immediately write off more expenses. that may benefit ruth, who is opening another restaurant in alexandria, virginia. 2 million self-employed americans will be able to receive a new deduction for health insurance. we will be increasing the tax break for anyone looking to open up a business. that is a $10,000 deduction. it can help with discouraging startup costs. future prosperity depends on whether regreting an environment in which folks can take new ideas for products to market and generate new business. that is not just a challenge of government. it is a challenge that requires businesses, leaders, universities, and others across this country. the second thing this bill does is we are going to make more loans available to small business. right now, there is the waiting list for sba loans. these are people who are ready to hire or expand, who have been approved by their banks, who are waiting for this legislation to pass. when i sign this bill, their weight will be over. will be [applause] v
workers were from canada, massachusetts, new york, international students running the hotels. >> on one part of that issue, we are a nation, and vermonters, i know are working in massachusetts and connecticut and that's what happens. contractors get a job and bring in their own people. i will tell you an issue we have with that that does concern me very much. immigration in this couldn't vi a serious issue and we have to deal with it in a comprehensive way. i voted against the immigration bill that came up last time primarily for one reason. you touched on that reason. we have programs called guest workers programs. guest workers programs are, a company says, we need a certain type of employee. and we can't find that employee in the united states. therefore we have to go to warsaw or someplace else. high tech companies use this for engineers and scientists. resort areas use it for a variety of reasons. you will be shocked to know, some years ago, here in the state of vermont, apparently we do not have people who can be ski instructors. did you know that? we just don't have enough people
, that was not happening. all these efforts combined will culminate at the acao summit in montreal, canada up where we hope to make our work for strengthening international standards for aviation security into an actual resolution the international community through acao and applicable to the entire system. it is important to note that in addition to acao the airline industry and the carriers themselves have been with us every step of the way. we have collaborated closely with the united states and international airline and airport straight associations -- trade associations and airline ceo's, shortly after christmas day, to explain what security enhancements needed to go in place immediately, but what we were striving for in the following weeks. i personally met with all of these leaders, and i also met with the heads of the international air travel association, and also with the ata. they have voiced strong support for the coordinated international approach that we have begun and that will be expressed, we hope, this fall at the acao general assembly. through that, it is clear that our potential for coll
assembly, which will be held this fall in montreal, canada, where we hope to make our work toward strengthening international standards for aviation security into an actual resolution of the international community and applicable to the entire system. i think it is also important to note that in addition to the organization, the airline industry and air carriers themselves have been with us every step of the way. we have collaborated closely with the united states and international airlines and airports trade associations. we have met with airline ceo's. we met with him shortly after christmas day to explain -- to talk about what security needed to go into place right away. i personally met with all of these leaders and i have also met with the heads of the international air traveler association and also with the ata and they have voiced strong support for the coordinated international approach that we have begun and that will be expressed, we hope, this fall at the general assembly. i think that through that, it is clear that our potential for collaboration goes beyond counterter
't know about immigration statistics. if she moved from san antonio to canada, to get a healthcare job. that's good. that's all good moving from florida to get more sun. healthcare interacts with a lot of different sectors. they have spent an enormous amount of money in healthcare and the military. to shuffle around where we spend money on military bases, gave $2.2 billion to build the finest military medical center in the world. >> raleigh, north carolina, good morning. caller: good morning. host: you're on, ma'am. caller: i have bit of an issue with the comment made. i am a healthcare worker. i am an rn. when you mention the expansion of healthcare and the need for jobs. i have been in a heavy medical area in north carolina and a large proportion in this area are in one of tech jobs or nursing or medical field. my comment was, when you mentioned minimal training, you mentioned nurses as part of that. i think that's not necessarily true. there are a lot of good physicians with minimal training, as an rn. i took a little bit of objection to that because it made it sound like the people
companies using these, especially in canada. i was wondering, on the state legislative side, is there anything we can do as an industry to help them work in the state-to-state level with one voice versus going individually state to state to try to get regulations that are written? all the states and to be moving toward this, but that a written more in compliance with what the national regulations that are being proposed and actually being brought out? is there any way that we can help to work with the states on that? thank you. >> well, i am not as familiar with the exact regulations you're talking about so far as the technology and the school buses. but so far as, you know, working with state legislators, again, i give you the invitation to contact me and talk directly with me. ncsl, on a whole, does not develop model legislation for states to adopt because, you know, the one size does not fit all, and we want to make sure states have flexibility in the way they approach legislation in their state. but i would at least welcome a conversation with you if there's an opportuni
with very diseases. a clinic and ontario, canada, has already created over 130 lines for 11 diseases. this clinic is also working on making lines to address diseases such as autism, schizophrenia. if there are additional funds, congress should invest in this type of a ground-breaking research. supporters of the embryonic research would like to ignore such accomplishments. they would suggest that providing federal taxpayer dollars on its embryonic stem cell research is the only means of getting results. however the accomplishment among adults -- it proves otherwise. i am proud to say that for a decade and a half, this amendment has protected life. this debate involves profound ethical, and moral questions. this is a matter of conscience for me, but more importantly, it is a matter of conscience for millions of americans who are deeply troubled by the idea that there taxpayer dollars may be used to destroy another human life. when there are other proven techniques available. i want to thank you very much for your time and i appreciate the opportunity to testify. >> senator weicker, tha
on the internet and going to some out of canada and they think it's safe and it's the same i could get at my local drug store and they order it, and it's coming through illicit bad operators, who are preying on america's sick and elderly. . every time f.d.a. goes out there and checks we're finding that on average 80% of those drugs, 80% of those drugs are either adult rated, knocked off or or they're counterfeit. now let's do the math. 13 international mail facilities, times 35,000 average pressure day, that gives you 455,000 of these pharmaceutical packages per day. times 365, now we're in excess of 160 million pharmaceutical packages. we're talking boxes of drugs. not just little ones, we're talking boxes of drugs. and if 80% of that number are counterfeit, knocked off drugs, we're in excess of 132 million. now, of a smaller percentage that the fda -- f.d.a. finds and discover, we have a return to sender policy. that's why i wanted to address this. you can believe that? f.d.a. has a return to sender policy. so here we are, i compliment you, we're going to say, ok, if there's drug
, canada, australia have undergone very significant reorganizations in the way they have overseen, leased, regulated, enforced safety and environmental protection in the offshore environment. did you look before you made some of your own proposals? it is unfair to ask a cabinet officer to talk about how seriously you might have considered moving something outside your own agency but has that come up? as the administration been involved in making judgments about proposals made by the former secretary and others about the functions and revenue raising and that they do not belong in the same department with the regulatory enterprises? that is a long list and i will hope that we get through a big -- a good bit of it. i would invite you to respond to any or as much of it as we can get through. >> absolutely, let me just say that there is no question that you should not ask me. you should ask about things we have done and things we will do in the future. those are all good questions that u.s.. with respect to the cultural mms, there is a clear statement i made when i hired and appointed with th
of their american parent for their entire childhood. canada, the united kingdom, have all asked japan on returning their abducted children. children japan's inaction on the issue is a thorn in the side of their relations with the entire international community. japan's current inaction violates their duties under the international covet on civil and political rights, article 23, to completely and unjustly ignore the equal rights of one parent. h.res. 1326 calls on japan to immediately and urgently establish a process for the resolution of abduction an wrongful retention of american children. japan must find the will to establish today a process that will justify and equitablely end the cruel separation currently endured by parent and children alike. h.res. 1326 also calls on japan to join the hague convention on the civil aspects of international child abduction. this convention sets out the international norms for resolution of abduction and wrongful retention cases and will create a framework to quickly resolve future cases and act as a deterrent to parents who now feel that they can abduct thei
. such as the sharp 225 study launching next month and studies in canada and europe. finally, wrapping up here, steps for harnessing technology, we have work to do, three big areas. one is to continue to support development of technology. i do think it can play a role to prevent distractions. these kinds of technology solutions need validation. we need research in passenger cars to figure out where they can deliver benefits, optimize those benefits and minimize any unintended consequences. secondly, we've got to make sure that as we introduce technologies, they continue to be integrated well, especially with the basic driver interface, and that will require shared guidelines across all manufactures, not just automakers and share test procedures. building hopefully on what the auto-- the alliance of automobile manufacturers has started and moving beyond that, perhaps, and finally, educating drivers to choose and use technology wisely because technology can only be a partner here. it requires a responsible driver. thank you. [applause] >> thank you. the federal government we recognize is one of limited
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)